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HOUSEHOLD CAVALRY REGIMENT

SOME INTERESTING INFORMATION

. . . AND A GLOSSARY OF MILITARY TERMS

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Equivalent Officer Ranks Of The Armed Services

Army

Field Marshal

General

Lieutenant-General

Major-General

Brigadier

Colonel

Lieutenant-Colonel

Major

Captain

Lieutenant

Navy

Admiral Of The Fleet

Admiral

Vice Admiral

Rear Admiral

Commodore

Captain

Commander

Lieutenant-Commander

Lieutenant

Sub-Lieutenant

Air Force

Marshal Of The Royal Air Force

Air Chief Marshal

Air Marshal

Air Vice-Marshal

Air Commodore

Group Captain

Wing Commander

Squadron Leader

Flight Lieutenant

Flying Officer

The Household Brigade (Household Division)

Household Cavalry

The Life Guards

The Blues And Royals

Ceremonial Uniforms - Main Identifiers

Red Tunics, White Plumes to Helmets (there are a few variations)

Navy Tunics, Red Plumes to Helmets

The Foot Guards
Ceremonial Uniforms - Main Identifiers
Grenadier Guards
Tunic Buttons spaced singly, White Plume on left side of Bearskin.
The Collar Badge is a "Grenade Fired Proper".
Coldstream Guards
Tunic Buttons in pairs, Red Plume on right side of Bearskin.
The Collar Badge is a Garter Star.
Scots Guards
Tunic Buttons in groups of three, plain black Bearskin (no Plume).
The Collar Badge is the Thistle.
Irish Guards
Tunic Buttons in groups of four, 6" Blue Cut Feathers (or Bristle) on
right side of Bearskin. The Collar Badge is a White Shamrock.
Welsh Guards
Tunic Buttons in groups of five, White/Green/White Cut Feathers
(or Bristle) on left side of Bearskin. The Collar Badge is the Leek.

AS YOU WERE (I THINK) ! ! !

In May 2009, I read that a decision had been made
(or was soon to be made) - in the interests of economy -
for ALL Foot Guards' tunics to be issued with just one
(standard) button arrangement.

Thereafter, examination of tunic button arrangements only
will not be of much help in identification of the Regiment.
Maybe there will be a re-think?

Foot Guards Regiments - Order Of Seniority

The correct order is as listed earlier (the Grenadier Guards are the senior Regiment),
and this is made easier to recall if you can remember the following sentence:

Guards Courageously Serve In Wars

(The initials correspond to the Regiments -
Grenadier, Coldstream, Scots, Irish, Welsh)

HCMR Facebook
www.facebook.com/HCMR/
Household Cavalry Museum
www.householdcavalrymuseum.co.uk
Household Cavalry Operational Casualties Fund
HQ Household Cavalry, Horse Guards, Whitehall, London SW1A 2AX

Household Cavalry Website

http://www.army.mod.uk/armoured/regiments/26869.aspx/
Household Cavalry Mounted Regiment
www.army.mod.uk/armoured/regiments/28071.aspx/
Household Cavalry Regiment
www.army.mod.uk/armoured/regiments/28072.aspx/

For Some Interesting, albeit Random, Snippets of Information, Just Click
HERE

Also, we are occasionally asked questions which we cannot fully answer.
YOU just might have the answer we seek - have a look . . .

PUZZLERS

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Glossary

Click on one of the letters below, to speed up your search

A B C D E F G H I J K L
M N O P Q R S T U W Y  

CAN YOU HELP?

If you feel that any definition requires amendment - or, better still, if you have
a (relevant) new one to add, please let me know by email (see below).
Thank you for your kind assistance.

info@householdcavalry.info

Word(s)
Definition or Meaning

A

2nd Lieutenant

about turn

adjutant

advance

aiguillettes

air-portable

airborne

amalgamation

ammo

ammo pouch

ammunition

ammunition pouch

arme blanche

armistice

armoured (men)

armoured (vehicles)

X

lowest officer rank in The Life Guards, equal to Cornet in RHG/D

drill movement, resulting in the soldier facing the opposite direction

an officer who acts as military assistant to a more senior officer

the act or process of going or moving forward, usually to attack

the points (needles) which hang at the end of shoulder cords

equipped and able to be rapidly transported and deployed by air

troops and/or vehicles transported by aircraft

the blending such as (in 1969) of The Royals with The Blues

abbreviation for ammunition

pouch designed to carry small arms ammunition

bullets, shells and the like, along with their fuses and primers

same as "ammo pouch" (see above)

weapon with a blade (literally "white weapon"); hand-to-hand sword fighting

in war, temporary cessation or suspension of hostilities (a truce)

troops wearing chain mail, or metal plates to protect against weapons

military vehicles clad with armour or a protective covering

B

band

barracks

barrage

battalion

battery

battle honours

bayonet

beret

Black Musketeers

blanket ride

Blues, The

boxman

brassard

breeches

brigade

Brigadier

buckskin

X

group of musicians who play together - such as for a regiment

building, or group of buildings, used to house military personnel

heavy curtain of artillery often placed ahead of troops, as protection

tactical military unit, usually comprising HQ and fighting companies

emplacement for one or more pieces of artillery

the honours won by regiments in battle, recorded on Standards

knife or spike adapted to fit the muzzle of a rifle, used in close combat

round, soft, brimless cap that fits the head - usually tilted to one side

defeated by The Royals, hence the black backing to all RHG/D ranks

morning exercise for horses taking part later on Queen's Life Guard

short name for the Royal Horse Guards, who wore Oxford blue tunics

each mounted dutyman stationed in the sentry boxes at Horse Guards

cloth badge of rank, worn round the upper arm, over a shirt sleeve

trousers extending down to, or just below the knees

body of troops smaller than a division, usually under a Brigadier

officer rank below Major-General, and above Colonel

pair of breeches made from deer skin, or (nowadays) sheepskin

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C

CAB

campaign

canter

canter past

Captain

carry, the

cartouche belt

cartouche box

cavalry

ceremonial axe

charge

Colonel

Colonel-in-Chief

column

combat

combat assault boots

commando

commission

composite

Cornet

corps

coveralls

cross belt

cross strap

cuirass

cuirasses

cuirassier

CVR(T)

X

abbreviation for combat assault boots, of which there are various types

military operations undertaken to achieve a specific objective

horse's gait, slower than the gallop but faster than the trot

undertaken during a review of mounted cavalry, at the canter

officer rank below Major, and above Lieutenant

to hold or carry while moving, such as a sword

originally designed for carrying gun cartridges

no longer used for carrying powder and shot, now mainly ornamental

troops trained to fight on horseback; highly mobile military unit

long-handled axe, with spike and blade, carried on parades by farriers

to make an attack by rushing forward, as by mounted cavalry

officer rank below Brigadier, and above Lieutenant-Colonel

usually the Sovereign, currently HM Queen Elizabeth II

formation of troops/vehicles, where the elements follow one another

an engagement fought between two military forces; the act of fighting

see "CAB" (above)

member of a fighting force specially trained for quick raids on enemy-held areas

official government document conferring officer rank in the services

made up of distinct components

lowest officer rank in The Blues And Royals, equal to 2nd Lieutenant

tactical unit of combat forces with two or more divisions plus support

loose-fitting one-piece garment worn by soldiers on some tasks, to protect clothing

belt worn diagonally across the chest, having a coloured 'flask' cord

strap (or belt) worn diagonally across chest or back, usually of regimental design

armour protecting the breast or back, nowadays worn ceremonially

the joint breast and back armour plates, worn as all-round protection

formerly, a horse soldier in European armies, equipped with a cuirass

short for Combat Vehicle, Reconnaissance (Tracked)

D

denims

deployment

detachment

dismounted

division

dragon

dragoon

dress (drill)

dress (uniform)

drill

drum horse

dutyman

X

another (military) name for coveralls (see above)

to station troops in or over an area, to carry out specific duties

the sending of troops on a special mission

cavalry personnel when on duty, but not on horseback

major unit of an army, larger than a regiment but smaller than a corps

a 16th century musket suitable for mounted infantry

name given to mounted infantry (after the 'dragon', a musket)

to arrange (men or vehicles) in orderly, regularly-spaced ranks

refers to all orders of dress, to ensure uniformity of appearance

disciplined, repetitious exercises to perfect procedures and skills

large horse capable of carrying heavy silver drums and rider

trained soldier, whether on Armoured or Mounted Regiment duties

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E

epaulette

equestrian

escort

exercise

X

ornamental shoulder piece - usually a badge of military office

pertaining to horsemanship, and cavalry (i.e. equestrian troops)

one or more guards, often armed, travelling with VIPs or goods

programme of practice manoeuvres undertaken as military training

F

farrier

field

flank

flask cord

forage

X

trained specialist who shoes horses and/or treats them medically

the scene of a battle, a former battle, or a battle while it is still in progress

the left or right side of a military formation

the coloured cord running centrally down the cross belt

food for horses, and the act of looking for such food

G

gallop

garrison

General

gilt

Gold Stick

gold stick, the

gortex

grenadier

guards

guerilla

Guidon

X

horse's fastest gait, in which all legs are off the ground at same time

military post, especially one permanently established; its troops

officer rank below Field Marshal, and above Lieutenant-General

gilded, having the appearance of gold

Regimental Colonel, and Gold Stick-in-Waiting to HM The Queen

the ebony staff, with a gold head - badge of office of Gold Stick

brand name (gore-tex) associated with water-repellant outdoor clothing

formerly a soldier who threw grenades (infantry or mounted)

term usually applied to all five Regiments of Foot Guards

member of an irregular military unit, usually politically motivated

flag or pennant, usually with forked end, carried as a Standard

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H

half-track

HCR

HCMR

head-dress

heavy cavalry

helmet

horse furniture

Horse Guards

Horse Guards Parade

horse holder

horsehair

Household Cavalry

HQ

H

military vehicle, lightly armoured, with caterpillar treads at the rear

Abbreviation for Household Cavalry Regiment

Abbreviation for Household Cavalry Mounted Regiment

anything worn on the head as covering, as ornament, or for protection

regiments descended from cuirassiers, cavalrymen completely covered in armour

known as the 'Albert' helmet, complete with plume spike

fittings and trappings worn by cavalry horses when on duty

still recognised as the official entrance to Buckingham Palace

major parade ground at the rear of Horse Guards

usually civilian personnel employed to tend the cavalry's horses

hair from horses, used to form the plume of some helmets

the two regiments of cavalry who guard the Sovereign

abbreviation for Headquarters

I

infantry

insignia

X

the branch of an army made up of units trained to fight on foot

distinguishing badge, in the military to denote rank

J

jack boots

X

firm boots, so named because the leather was 'jacked' (stiffened)

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K

kettle drums

khaki

X

large copper or silver drums, with head that can be tuned by tension

a light olive-brown to moderate yellowish-brown; a sturdy cloth of this colour

L

lance

lanyard

Lieutenant

Lieutenant-Colonel

Lieutenant-General

light cavalry

long guard

X

thrusting (cavalry) weapon with long shaft, and sharp metal head

formerly a (neck) cord to hold knife or whistle, or with hook used to fire a cannon

officer rank below Captain, and above 2nd Lieutenant (and Cornet)

officer rank below Colonel, and above Major

officer rank below General, and above Major-General

cavalry equipped with the minimum, necessary armour - allowing speed of movement

when The Queen is in residence - with Officer, WO, and Standard

M

Major

Major-General

mechanise

merger

mess

microchip

mounted

mounted dutyman

musicians

musket

musketeer

X

officer rank below Lieutenant-Colonel, and above Captain

officer rank below Lieutenant-General, and above Brigadier

to equip (a cavalry unit) with motor vehicles, such as tanks or trucks

such as the alliance of The Life Guards with The Blues And Royals

military personnel who eat meals together; the place where they eat (and live)

fitted to all Household Cavalry horses, for identification purposes

serving on horseback, or equipped with a horse or horses

soldier, trained to carry out all mounted ceremonial duties

bandspersons (soldiers ranging in ranks from trooper up)

smoothbore shoulder gun, used from the late 16th to 18th century

formerly, a soldier armed with a musket

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N

NCO

No 1 Dress

No 2 Dress (HCR)

No 2 Dress (HCMR)

non-commissioned officer

X

non-commissioned officer (see below)

navy patrol jacket, regimentally striped overalls, wellington boots/spurs, forage cap

khaki tunic, matching trousers, shirt/tie, CAB boots, forage cap (or SD cap)

khaki tunic, riding breeches, riding boots, forage cap (or SD cap)

a subordinate officer in the army or marines; appointed from enlisted personnel

O

officer

onion

orderly

orderly officer

orderly room

overalls

X

one holding a commission in the armed forces

refers to the "onion" shape on plumes of The Life Guards

soldier assigned to attend upon a superior officer and to carry orders or messages

officer in charge of security and administration of a unit or establishment for a day

the office used for administration in the barracks of a military unit

special trousers, with straps on the bottoms (usually striped regimentally)

P

pantaloons

pass out

patrol

patrol jacket

patrols

phase I training

phase 2 training

plume

pouch belt

PSM

X

also known as buff (riding) breeches - white in colour since 1812

formal recognition of successful completion of specific training phase

military unit sent out on a reconnaissance mission

military unit sent out on a reconnaissance mission

navy tunic, navy trousers, shoes (with or without cap) - trousers plain (no stripes)

in which soldiers learn the fundamentals of soldiering

in which soldiers continue with their specialist (army) training

worn to decorate the helmet - made from horse hair or yak hair

belt holding the pouch, formerly used to carry ammunition

Military music term - stands for "Passed School of Music Advanced Examination"

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Q

QLG

quarters

Queen's Birthday Parade

Queen's Life Guard

X

abbreviation for Queen's Life Guard

another name for troops' accommodation

annual parade, better-known as Trooping of The Colour

Guard mounted daily at Horse Guards

R

rank (men)

rank (status)

RCM

rearguard

reconnaissance

recruit

regiment

reserve

RHQ

ride (noun)

ride (verb)

rifle

Royals, The

RQMC

X

a line of soldiers, vehicles, or equipment - side by side in close order

relative position or grade in the military (i.e. the rank of Corporal)

Regimental Corporal Major (cavalry equivalent to Regimental Sergeant Major)

detachment of troops that protects the rear of a military force

process or activity of surveying a terrain, to locate/identify the enemy

newly enlisted member of the army, usually of lowest grade or rank

permanent military unit, usually commanded by a Lieutenant-Colonel

armed forces not on active duty, but subject to call in an emergency

Abbreviation for Regimental Headquarters

name sometimes given to a group of riders on a specific duty or task

to sit on, control and be conveyed by a horse (or vehicle)

firearm with a rifled bore, designed to be fired from the shoulder

short name for The Royal Dragoons (1st Dragoons)

Regimental Quartermaster Corporal (an appointment)

S

sabre

sabre squadron

saddle

saddlery

salute

Sam Browne Belt

scabbard

SCM

seaborne

sentry

service dress

shabraque

sheepskins

short guard

Silver Stick

slope, the

Sovereign's Standard

spurs

SQMC

squadron

staircase party

Standard

standing orders

State dress

State sword

State trumpeters

subaltern

surcingle

sword

sword slings

heavy cavalry sword with a one-edged, slightly curved blade

a squadron of mounted cavalry

leather seat for a rider, secured on a horse's back by a girth

saddle, harness and other equipment for horses (known as tack)

To recognise a military officer with a gesture (raised hand to cap)

leather belt supported by a strap over the right shoulder

sheath or container for a sword (or dagger)

Squadron Corporal Major (senior WO in a squadron)

conveyed by sea, transported by ships or boats

soldier posted to prevent access by unauthorised persons

similar to No 2 dress (see earlier)

decorative throw under the sheepskins on horses

skin of a sheep, tanned with the fleece left on

when The Queen is out of London - commanded by a Corporal of Horse

Colonel, Commander Household Cavalry, deputy to Gold Stick

with the rifle in a sloping position, resting on the shoulder

Standard (flag) bearing the Royal Arms

spikes or spiked wheels on rider's boots, used to urge horse forwards

Squadron Quartermaster Corporal

division below a Regiment, made up of Troops

soldiers deployed on ceremonial duties, to line steps or staircases

flag of a mounted military regiment (in battle, was rallying point)

specific rules governing the manner in which military units operate

ceremonial orders of dress, worn on State occasions (also State kit)

carried on all ceremonial duties, in the presence of Royalty

trumpeters deployed on State occasions, fanfares, etc.

holding military rank below Captain (i.e. Lieutenant, 2nd Lieutenant)

girth that binds a saddle, pack or blanket to the body of a horse

weapon with a handle and long blade for cutting and thrusting

belt attachments to facilitate the "wearing" of a sword on parades

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T

theatre

tour

troop

Trooper

trot

trot past

tunic

X

the setting for unusual events (i.e. theatre of war)

a period of duty at a single place, or on a specif task

smallest unit in the cavalry regiment

cavalry equivalent to a Private in the infantry

the gait of a horse, between a walk and a canter

undertaken during a review of mounted cavalry, at the trot

dates from the tunic worn in 1856 (only buttons have changed)

U

uniform

uniformal

Union Standard

unit

X

the collective items of kit that form a unit (order of dress), so that all soldiers conform

used to describe an item of uniform applicable to a specific regiment (uniformal shirt)

or Squadron Standard (flag), featuring the rose, thistle and shamrock

organised tactical or admin group, part of larger military grouping

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W

walk

walk past

Warrant Officer

watering order

WO

X

the slowest gait of a horse

undertaken during a review of mounted cavalry, at the walk

military officer having authority by virtue of a warrant (see "WO")

morning exercise for horses not on that day's Queen's Life Guard

Warrant Officer - in rank, between a NCO and a commissioned officer

Y

yak

yard

yearling

yoke

yomp

Ypres

X

long-haired bovine mammal of central Asia, where it is often domesticated

area of land adjacent to, or surrounded by a building or buildings (i.e. stable yard)

horse that is one year old, or has not completed its second year

crossbar with two U-shaped pieces that encircle the necks of a pair of working horses

the (military) act of advancing on foot, at a fast pace, carrying one's equipment

town in southwestern Belgium, site of three battles during World War I

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INTERESTING & RANDOM SNIPPETS OF INFORMATION

Life Guards Overalls - The Red Striping

Life Guards Overall Stripes

In 1922, it was decided that the 1st Life Guards and 2nd Life Guards would amalgamate,
becoming The Life Guards. Until that time, 1st Life Guards had a single, wide red welt down
each side of their overalls; 2nd Life Guards had three red red welts down each side of their
overalls - two wide stripes divided by a narrow one.

Prince Albert, overseeing the amalgamation, insisted that the combined, new Regiment
should adopt the features of the two Regiments that (in his words) were "the prettiest".
Therefore, the three red stripes formerly worn by the 2nd Life Guards would be adopted
for The Life Guards Regiment from then onward.


The Mermaid of Warsaw

Badge - Mermadi Of Warsaw

The 1st Household Cavalry Regiment, formed at the beginning of the Second World War,
went to the Middle East as a horsed Cavalry Regiment and by the time of the Battle of Alemein
had been reorganised as an Armouired Car Regiment.

On the 12th April 1944, under the command of Lieutenant Colonel Eric Gooch (later
Colonel Sir Robert Gooch, Baronet), The 1st Household Cavalry Regiment landed in Italy and
came under the command of 5th Corps. From 13th August to 3rd September 1944, they were
were under command of the Second Polish Corps, and as part of KAW force they led the
advance of the Corps to the river Metauro, on to the Gothic Line and to the capture of Pasaro.

In view of their outstanding service with the Polish troops, Lieutenant General W. Anders,
who commanded the 2nd Polish Corps and Commander-in-Chief of the Polish Army of the East,
decided to honour The Regiment by granting them the distinction of wearing the badge of the
"Mermaid of Warsaw". This was approved by His Majesty King George VI, and it was laid down
that all members serving with The 1st Household Cavalry Regiment during their period of
service with the 2nd Polish Corps, would in future be permitted to wear the badge on their
left forearm in battledress.

The badge has continued to be proudly worn by members of the Regiment, and the last
serving member with this privilege was Major (Quartermaster) Eric Sant, who joined the
Army in June 1943, and served with the 1st Household Cavalry Regiment from July 1944.

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